Once Upon a Time: Feminine Tales

exhibition concept 


My work leads us to discover our perception, bodily feelings, and feminine knowledge. I embody a "memory chain" in women's hair, where women have transferred their experiences in many different fields from fertility to production, from cooking to raising people, from laughing to pain. I aim to remember the presence of a female hero in my body and to reach out from my body to my hair and from my hair to the images of strong women through purifying rituals by being articulated to the primitive time female shaman tradition. Hair processes the information and state of the body, its spiritual and physical damage, sort of, it weaves the body's timeline through the marks it carries. Just like the quipus, the object of which the Incas are made knot by knot on strings, where historical information is recorded, hair is an image related to word and knowledge. Hair is identified with the thread with its knitted, tied, and cut structure. hair can be delicate, defenseless, and invisible with a single strand; it can be durable, dominant, visible, and occlusive when many are together. The hair creates a memory space extending from the past to the present by maintaining the matter-mind link in the body or as it is separated from the body. That space is precisely the place of my feminine stories.

Spinner film*,

6'45 '' 


Clotho, in some places Nona or Urðr, is the one who spun the thread of life from her distaff onto her spindle, spans new lives in life between his hands weaving life. She is the goddess who, along with her sisters Lachesis and Atropos, controls life, death, and then life again. This is her known myth. In this film, Clotho, Spinner, is spinning her own hair so that it can be rooted in anybody (or place) it touches so that it can give life. She is steadily spinning hair to extend a path from the hair weaved by knowledge and experience from the first woman to the last woman.

*the video link is private, if you want to see it, send a request via email.